The Decision of Someone Else’s Life

With the election of the new Canadian government, late last year, euthanasia and assisted suicide have become hotly debated topics. The current laws have been struck down and are being redrafted in order to include some form of medical aid in dying.

 

In a recent article, certain high-ranking officials from the college of medicine have even expressed opposition to the concept of conscientious objection by physicians who do not wish to perform these types of procedures. They have even suggested that doctors who do not agree should be barred from practicing altogether and new incoming medical students need to be screened out if they hold such beliefs.

 

So much for all that tolerance that secular society is always proclaiming…

 

The idea behind this is that physicians should put patient needs above their own integrity and perform anything that they want done. However, do you remember the last time you had an illness? Did you feel like you had the capability to make any kind of important decision? I know I sure didn’t. I was too busy feeling miserable and not really knowing what to do with myself. I certainly didn’t know what was good for me or what wasn’t in that instance and neither do other sick people.

 

I think that everyone recognize this on some level. There are circumstances where patients are deemed incapable of making decisions for a variety of reasons and those decisions then get deferred to someone else. The problem is now the patient is not deciding and the person in charge of them may be making a decision that goes against the patient’s will.

 

No one seems to take issue with this so why demonize doctors that simply wish to do the same? Why is there the need to force everyone to adhere to secular morality that they may not agree with? Secular morality, with no central authority, where right and wrong are decided by popular vote. As a nation, we can do better than this. We have the capability to implement health care practices that do not treat human beings as expendable that do not convey message of hopelessness and despair.

 

I know it’s not easy, Illnesses, especially chronic and ravaging ones, are no laughing matter. Disabilities are hard to accept as part of God’s plan but nothing is in vain. If the lord allows something, then there is a greater good behind it, even if we can’t see the whole picture yet. So keep fighting whatever battle you find yourself in, become heroes, pick up your crosses and become saints

 

http://news.nationalpost.com/health/ban-conscientious-objection-by-canadian-doctors-urge-ethicists-in-volatile-commentary?__lsa=1831-5abf